Aristarchus crater - 2007.09.23. - Tamás Bognár
Aristarchus crater – 2007.09.23. – Tamás Bognár

Also known as: Aristarchus  crater
Date/time: 2007.09.23.
Equipment: 76/900 Newtonian
Magnification and filter(s): 118x
Seeing: 7/10 Transparency: 3/5
Humidity: low
Wind: none
Location: Zákány, Hungary N46°14′ 59,2″ E16°57′ 15,3″
Observer: Bognár Tamás

Named after the Greek astronomer Aristarchus of Samos, is a prominent lunar impact crater that lies in the northwest part of the Moon’s near side. It is considered the brightest of the large formations on the lunar surface, with an albedo nearly double that of most lunar features. The feature is bright enough to be visible to the naked eye, and is dazzling in a large telescope. It is also readily identified when most of the lunar surface is illuminated by earthshine.

Description:
Circular formation visible during the Earthshine. Important rays. Transcient phenomena. Forms an interesting couple with Herodotus. Young formation (450 millions of years). Steep slopes especially to the North. High walls in terraces. Few and extensive flat floor. Small central mountain.

Observation:
Interest : Exceptional formation
Observation period: 4 days after First Quarter or 3 days after Last Quarter
Minimal Instrument: 50 mm refractor

Position:
Longitude: 47.490° West
Latitude: 23.730° North
Side: Nearside
Quadrant: North-West
Area: Aristarchus crater region


‎Gary Varney‎ – Amateur Astronomy Selenology Project
“Good evening. What a great week for image posts, there were many to choose from and it is hard to single out just one. This week we do have two selections. The first is a very nice sketch of Theophilus by Univerzum Képekben (a.k.a. Bognár Tamás) for the Hand Drawn category. He also posted another of Posidonius. Very nice work indeed! Congratulations Tamás.”

Posidonius crater - speed sketch - Bognár Tamás, Zákány
Posidonius crater – speed sketch – Bognár Tamás, Zákány

Also known as: Posidonius crater
Date/time: 2016.03.14.  16:30-16:40 UT
Equipment: 235/1280 OptiScope, dobsonian mount,
+ Scopium SWA 15,10 ; Planetary 5mm
Seeing: 8/10
Transparency: 3-4/5
Col. : 342.5°
Temperature: –
Humidity: –
Wind: low
Location: Zákány, Hungary N46°14′ 59,2” E16°57′ 15,3”
Observer: Tamás Bognár

Media : Wood-free drawing paper, H and HB pencil.

Posidonius is a lunar impact crater that is located on the north-eastern edge of Mare Serenitatis, to the south of Lacus Somniorum. The crater Chacornac is attached to the southeast rim, and to the north is Daniell.

The rim of Posidonius is shallow and obscured, especially on the western edge, and the interior has been overlain by a lava flow in the past. The crater ramparts can still be observed to the south and east of the crater rim, and to a lesser degree to the north.

There is a smaller, semi-circular rim of a concentric, flooded crater within the main rim, offset towards the eastern edge. There is no central peak, but the floor is hilly and laced with a rille system named the Rimae Posidonius. The floor is also slightly bulged due to the past lava uplift, which also likely produced the complex of rilles. The northeast rim is interrupted by the smaller crater Posidonius B. Within the crater rim, offset just to the west of center is another smaller crater Posidonius A.

Observation:
Interest : Exceptional formation
Observation period: 5 days after New Moon or 4 days after Full Moon
Minimal Instrument: 50 mm refractor

Theophilus crater - sketch - Bognár Tamás, Zákány
Theophilus crater – sketch – Bognár Tamás, Zákány

Also known as: Theophilus crater
Date/time: 2016.03.14.  18:00-18:10 UT
Equipment: 235/1280 OptiScope, dobsonian mount,
+ Scopium SWA 15,10 ; Planetary 5mm
Seeing: 8/10
Transparency: 3-4/5
Col. : 343°
Temperature: –
Humidity: –
Wind: low
Location: Zákány, Hungary N46°14′ 59,2” E16°57′ 15,3”
Observer: Bognár Tamás

Theophilus is a prominent lunar impact crater that lies between Sinus Asperitatis in the north and Mare Nectaris to the southeast. It partially intrudes into the comparably sized crater Cyrillus to the southwest.

Description:
Circular formation forming a remarkable trio with Cyrillus and Catharina. Tormented and steep slopes overhanging Sinus Asperitatis from 1200m and supporting Cyrillus to the South-East Theophilus F to the West and Mädler to the East. Very high walls with terraces overlapped by Theophilus B to the North-West. Flat floor. Imposing central mountain 1 400 m high with 4 summits. Line of crests hills and craterlets.

Observation:
Interest : Exceptional formation
Observation period: 5 days after New Moon or 4 days afterFull Moon
Minimal Instrument: 10x binoculars

Position:
Longitude: 26.285° East
Latitude: 11.452° South
Side: Nearside
Quadrant: South-East
Area: Theophilus crater North-West region

Tycho Crater - Bognár Tamás
Tycho Crater – Bognár Tamás

Also known as: Tycho crater
Date/time: 2016.03.17 . UT 16:40
Equipment: 150/2250 Newton
Seeing: 6-8/10
Transparency: 2-4/5
Temperature: ~6°C
Humidity: –
Wind: –
Location: Canis Maior Solar Observatory, Nagykanizsa , Hungary N46° 27′ 13.81″ E16° 59′ 05.57″
Observer: Bognár Tamás

Media: DMK 41AU02.AS (USB) + AutoStakkert! 2  + Registrax6 + GIMP
A picture was taken using a 500-frame video.